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Art Center and Gallery
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Jack Wolfe

Civil Rights Paintings: A Viewing in 2020
Anderson Virtual
June - June 2021

Jack Wolfe

Native American Paintings
Anderson Virtual
September - March 2021

Maxwell

Hall of Black Achievement

First Floor Lounge


DMF Science and Mathematics

Visions of the Future

Travel the Solar System


The Wellness Center at Weygand Hall

Travis Bedel

October 2018 - December 2021

 

 


Wallace

(l-r) Dr. Wallace L. Anderson, Prof. Robert Barnett, Pres. Adrian Rondileau

 

     
 
 

Exhibitions

 
Hoba

Hall of Black Achievement

For over twenty years the Massachusetts Hall of Black Achievement (HOBA) discovered, detailed and disclosed the significant achievements and contributions of African Americans, Cape Verdeans, and Hispanics of African descent who made significant contributions to the Commonwealth.

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Wolfe

Anderson Engaged

The Anderson Gallery aims to serve its diverse public as a dynamic, innovative, and welcoming center for learning through the arts and seeks to act as a catalyst for the broader understanding and exploration of ideas across cultural and visual boundaries.

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Gendre

Greg Wyatt


Greg and Fay Wyatt Sculpture Garden

The bronze works of Greg Wyatt interprets and reimagines famous poems into the language of dance. This initial group of twelve plaques with their accompanying poems are the first phase of the Greg and Fay Wyatt Sculpture garden at Bridgewater State University. These works join the sculpture "Spirit of the Dance" by Greg Wyatt which depicts the dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov suspended in mid-leap.

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Wolfe

Jack Wolfe


Native American Paintings
Anderson Virtual

Jack Wolfe's interest in and affinity toward Native American communities and cultures began in childhood, when he and his sister spent summers in the Lake Tahoe area, often visiting a Washo community where they played with other children and listened to stories. Jack’s concern with the historical and contemporary oppression of Native Americans by the United States, including acts of genocide and cultural genocide (e.g., forced assimilation; proscriptions on use of languages and cultural practices; adoption of abducted or removed Native American children into white families – a practice that persisted through much of the 20th century), the breaking of federal treaties, and exploitation of Native American land, among other acts of overt and structural violence, persisted throughout his life.

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Wolfe

Jack Wolfe


Civil Rights Paintings: A Viewing in 2020
Anderson Virtual

In recent weeks, the images flooding traditional and social media of current protests against racial injustice and the killing of black people encourage reflection on similarities and areas of progress between the present and the time of the civil rights movement. Across the over-saturated span of highly polarized contemporary media, some rhetoric has shifted, while other aspects of the dialogue about race and racism echo the past uncannily.

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New to the Collection

 

Black Voice - Freedom Summer
Jack Wolfe
Donated by Melinda Greason

 

Negroes in the Trees #11
Amani Lewis

Neo Sole
Victor "Marka27" Quiñonez

 

Mountain Ash
Lyia Ratner
Donated by Laurence and Katherine Doherty

Boot Mill - Lowell
Donald Stoltenberg
Donated by Roger T. Dunn and Howard John Stapf

 

The Visitor
Shiko Munakata
Donated by Ellen P. Farren

Baryshnikov
Greg Wyatt
Donated by the artist

 

Anderson Gallery Publications

 
Stopforth
Stopforth
 
Jerzyk
Moxhay
 
Sculpture
Ceramics
Drawn Drawing